Massive mile-wide asteroid set to fly by Earth on tomorrow

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A ‘potentially hazardous’ asteroid estimated to be nearly a mile wide is set for an relatively close flyby with Earth tomorrow.

Object 2014 JO25, dubbed The Rock after wrestler Dwayne Johnson, is said to be ‘among the strongest asteroid radar targets of the year,’ and will pass by our planet within just 4.6 lunar distances tomorrow.

According to NASA, it’s the closest shave we’ve had with an asteroid of this size in the last decade, and isn’t expected to come this close again for at least 400 years.

A ‘potentially hazardous’ asteroid estimated to be nearly a mile wide is set for an alarmingly close flyby with Earth tomorrow (stock image). Its diameter is estimated to fall between 640 meters and 1.4 kilometers (0.4 to 0.9 miles)

A ‘potentially hazardous’ asteroid estimated to be nearly a mile wide is set for an alarmingly close flyby with Earth tomorrow (stock image). Its diameter is estimated to fall between 640 meters and 1.4 kilometers (0.4 to 0.9 miles)

The object was first spotted by the Mt Lemmon Survey in Arizona in May 2014. 

Not much is known about the celestial object, but Nasa has predicted that it is twice as reflective as the moon.

This means it could be visible from Earth.  

Its diameter is estimated to fall between 640 meters and 1.4 kilometers (0.4 to 0.9 miles) and it will travel at about 33 meters per second (73 mph).

It will pass at a distance of 1.1 million miles – or about 4.6 times the distance from Earth to the moon. 

It is due to pass tomorrow at 8:24AM ET (1:24PM BST).

Space Explorer Ron Baalke, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, warned of the object in a tweet last year, showing how its orbit brings the massive space rock frighteningly close to Earth.

Asteroid 2014 JO25 is classified as a ‘potentially hazardous Asteroid,’ to NASA.

Space Explorer Ron Baalke, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, warned of the object in a tweet last year, showing how its orbit brings the massive space rock frighteningly close to Earth.

Space Explorer Ron Baalke, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, warned of the object in a tweet last year, showing how its orbit brings the massive space rock frighteningly close to Earth.

Space Explorer Ron Baalke, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, warned of the object in a tweet last year, showing how its orbit brings the massive space rock frighteningly close to Earth.

But, it’s expected to flyby safely at about 4.6 lunar distances (roughly 1,766,400 km or 1,097,590 miles).

‘The 2017 flyby is the closest by an asteroid at least this large since the encounter by 4179 Toutatis at four lunar distances in September 2004,’ the space agency explains.

‘The next known flyby by an object with a comparable or larger diameter will occur when 800-m-diameter asteroid 1999 AN10 approaches within one lunar distance in August 2027.

‘The 2017 encounter is the closest by this asteroid for at least the last 400 years. There are no known future encounters by 2014 JO25 as close as the one in 2017 through 2500.’

NASA’S ASTEROID REDIRECT MISSION 

Nasa is planning ambitious mission that will see a robotic spaceship visit an asteroid to create an orbiting base for astronauts.

The robot ship will pluck a large boulder off the space rock and sling it around the moon, becoming a destination to prepare for future human missions to Mars.

Nasa plans to study the asteroid for about a year and test deflection techniques that one day may be necessary to save Earth from a potentially catastrophic collision.

Although the target asteroid is not expected to be officially selected until 2020, NASA is using 2008 EV5 as the reference asteroid while the search continues for potential alternates.

Before beginning its trip to lunar orbit, the ARM spacecraft will demonstrate a widely supported asteroid deflection technique called a gravity tractor.

The spacecraft plus the mass of the captured boulder will create a small gravitational attraction to alter the orbit of the large asteroid.

After collecting a multi-ton boulder from the asteroid, the robotic spacecraft will slowly redirect the boulder to an orbit around the moon, using the moon’s gravity for an assist, where NASA plans to conduct a series of proving ground missions in the 2020s.

There, astronauts will be able to select, extract, collect, and return samples from the multi-ton asteroid mass, and conduct other human-robotic and spacecraft operations in the proving ground that will validate concepts for NASA’s journey to Mars. 

Earlier this month, the famous Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacombini-Kresák, flew past our planet at the closest distance since its discovery.

On April 1, the object came 13.2 million miles (21.2 million km) away from Earth.

Comet 41P belongs to the group Jupiter comets, which are objects that have been caught up in Jupiter’s massive gravity and now orbit between the sun and the giant planet.

Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacombini-Kresák (circled) alongside Dusty (middle), an edge-on spiral galaxy and the owlish Messier 97 (right), a planetary nebula, in a telescopic image

Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacombini-Kresák (circled) alongside Dusty (middle), an edge-on spiral galaxy and the owlish Messier 97 (right), a planetary nebula, in a telescopic image

Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacombini-Kresák (circled) alongside Dusty (middle), an edge-on spiral galaxy and the owlish Messier 97 (right), a planetary nebula, in a telescopic image

The comet was first discovered in 1858 and circles the sun every five and a half years.

But this year the comet’s perihelion point, the part of its orbit that is closest to the sun, is just outside Earth’s orbit.

This created a six-day period from March 29 to April 3 when the comet will come closer to Earth than ever before.

It reached its closest point, roughly a tenth of the distance between the sun and Earth, on April Fool’s Day. 



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