Georgia voters in this reliably Republican district may be preparing to ‘stick it’ to Trump

In Nation
It's only fair to share...Email this to someone
email
Print this page
Print


This orderly swath of Atlanta suburbs was never supposed to worry Republicans. They’ve had a lock on the congressional seat since 1979, with a string of rock-ribbed conservatives such as and Tom Price.

Then Donald Trump happened.

Now the GOP is in an unexpected scramble to prevent a politically inexperienced millennial Democrat — unknown months ago — from turning their longtime stronghold blue.

Party officials are filled with angst ahead of the April 18 special election in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District to replace Price, who vacated the seat to become Trump’s Health and Human Services secretary.

After a scare for Republicans in Kansas on Tuesday, when a congressional race got uncomfortably close in a district Trump had dominated in the , the Georgia fight teeters on becoming a full-blown crisis for a party that should be relishing its recent success and consolidating power. A Democratic win here, unthinkable only weeks ago, is now a very real possibility. It would be yet another indication that Democrats are not the only party hobbled by a national identity crisis in the age of Trump.

“Nothing like this has ever happened before in Georgia,” Charles S. Bullock III, a University of Georgia political science professor, said of the exorbitantly expensive free-for-all the race has become.

With Democratic donors nationwide rallying around 30-year-old Jon Ossoff, the surprise front-runner has raised a staggering $8.3 million, dwarfing contributions to all 11 of his Republican rivals combined.

For Democrats, the allure of the Sunbelt district stems from voter uneasiness about Trump, who barely won here in November. By contrast, Mitt Romney, the last GOP nominee, crushed Barack Obama by double digits.

Ossoff is polling at around 43%, far beyond any of his contenders in the open primary. That’s largely because the GOP candidates are splitting the vote.

But Ossoff is now within striking distance of winning the majority required to avoid a runoff in June, which may be his best hope, since many believe a two-candidate runoff would favor the Republican.

“Two or three months ago, nobody had a clue who this guy was,” Bullock said.

As they lined up at polls this week for early voting, several residents made clear they were viewing the race as a referendum on the president.

“The Trump administration is scary,” said Jeffrey Chou, a 25-year-old graduate student voting for the first time who came to support Ossoff. “I don’t like what they are doing. I felt it was important to come out and send a message that we don’t support it.”



It's only fair to share...Email this to someone
email
Print this page
Print
www.renesans-centr.kiev.ua

Аккумуляторы мутлу

штори в дитячу кімнату фото

Mobile Sliding Menu